New standards for National Curriculum

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New standards for National Curriculum

Postby Dagsannr » Mon Jun 11, 2012 1:35 pm

From http://education.gov.uk/inthenews/inthe ... wnatcurric

•There will be a greater focus on the acquisition of scientific knowledge with new content on the solar system, speed and evolution.


The programmes of study announced today include modules in years four and five on ‘Evolution and inheritance’. In year four, pupils will explore ‘how characteristics are passed from one generation to another’, and ‘explain how the human skeleton has changed over time, since we separated from other primates’. In year six, pupils will ‘be introduced to the fossil as evidence for evolution’ and ‘how animals and plants are suited to and adapt to their environment in different ways; and how this leads to evolution.’

Hoo yah :-D
There are 2 types of people in the world:

Those who can extrapolate from incomplete data.
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Re: New standards for National Curriculum

Postby cathy » Mon Jun 11, 2012 2:51 pm

:D :D :D :D

I would just love to be a fly on sobbing Sylvs wall. Or any creationists wall.

The teaching of science in Lower Key Stage 2 should ensure that pupils know about a variety of plants and animals (including humans), materials and everyday phenomena.
Pupils should study (by working scientifically, working practically, and using a variety of research methods including using books and ICT):
 The function of different parts of plants, and what plants need to survive;
 What animals need to survive
 Movement in vertebrates, including humans
 Classification of living things: plants and animals
 Human digestion
 Food chains and food webs
Introduction to evolution and inheritance
 Everyday materials that are attracted to magnets, or that sink/float
 How to make a magnet and the properties of magnets
 Simple physical properties of some kinds of rocks, and how rocks and fossils are formed
 States of matter and changes of state, with particular reference to water
 Sources of sound
 Light and shadows
 Solar systems and galaxies, including the motion of the Earth in relation to the Sun
 The uses of electricity, and how to wire a simple circuit.
Science biographies, for example, Carl Linnaeus, Charles Darwin, Nicholas Copernicus, Galileo Galilei and Neil Armstrong. .
‘Working scientifically’ is to be delivered through the teaching of substantive subject content, and is not to be taught separately as content in its own right.


Evolution and inheritance
Pupils should be taught to:
 describe how plants and animals, including humans, resemble their parents in many features [148]
 explain how the human skeleton has changed over time, since we separated from other primates, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of being on two feet rather than four. [149]
Evolution and inheritance
Ensure pupils are introduced to how characteristics are passed from one generation to another, and the idea of inheritance; they would not be expected to understand how genes and chromosomes work at this stage. [150]
Ensure pupils are introduced to the idea of adaptation and how the human skeleton has changed over time. This should be linked to the topic on the skeletal and muscular system in humans. [151]
Pupils can apply their knowledge and skills by:
 identifying, comparing and recording similarities and differences among themselves such as eye colour, hair colour, hand spans (e.g. through photographs, videos, drawings, and bar charts).
 recording the evolutionary progression of the human skeleton e.g. through drawings, charts, displays, and discussing the advantages and disadvantages of being on two feet rather than four.
 exploring dog breeding, and how dogs are all the same species but have been bred to have distinctive characteristics associated with different breeds.
 finding out about how cross breeding and selective breeding has led to improvements in the usefulness to humans of many plants and domestic animals. [152]
At this stage, pupils should be introduced to the ideas of inheritance, adaptation and evolution. These topics will be further explored in Upper Key Stage 2. [


And in year 6
Evolution and inheritance
Pupils should be taught to:
 give reasons why living things produce offspring of the same kind, but in many cases offspring are not identical with each other or with their parents [249]
Evolution and inheritance
Building on the topic on Rocks in Year 3, pupils should be introduced to the fossil as evidence for evolution. This can include how they are formed, the types of plants and animals most likely to be preserved as fossils, and how fossils are used to explore the characteristics of prior animals and plants. Pupils can be introduced to the work of palaeontologists.

At long last. Pupils had to wait until nearly year 10 to get this stuff. And there is finally stuff about rocks. A lot of the rest of the primary stuff looks pretty much the same to me.
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Re: New standards for National Curriculum

Postby GrumpyBob » Mon Jun 11, 2012 3:41 pm

Hooray for this, but are Academies and Free Schools required to toe the line when it comes to the National Curriculum. I think not, so we do still need to watch out for creationist Free School bids...

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Re: New standards for National Curriculum

Postby cathy » Mon Jun 11, 2012 3:53 pm

Thanks to everyone at bcse, and Laura's petition for your hard work.

Oh and perhaps it is time to thank some of the unsung heros:

Heres to Phillip Bell and his friends at CMI, for demonstrating creationist tenacity and the level of threat they pose to Gove and the DfE.

To the good folk at TiS. Without your websites rallying cry to contribute to Goves call for evidence he may never have witnessed first hand the damage to critical faculties caused by creationism. After all who could fail to remain immune to its' dangers after receiving emails from your more fervent supporters, perhaps a Phillip Snow or Ploughboy clone.

All those hardworking creationists.like Garner, Sylv and Marc, for tirelessly demonstrating their complete lack of evidence - by talking b@@@@@ks, and by their dodgy looking reluctance to engage with real scientists.

For their endless use of pointless terms like worldview and paradigm and for those endless accusations that those accepting evolution must have atheist or satanic agendas which must have resonated deeply with KJV bible providing, evolution accepting Gove.

And finally a special thanks to sobbing Sylv and all her creationist loon pawns trying to open schools. Who must also have opened Goves eyes to the real threat to the children of GB. :D :D
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Re: New standards for National Curriculum

Postby GrumpyBob » Mon Jun 11, 2012 4:25 pm

It's worth looking at this article at the CASE website: Science lesson reforms leave campaigners bemused. For example:
“The Government’s decision in February not to stop Academies from teaching creationism as a valid science, through a change in the model funding agreement, remains a big concern. This decision was made despite them already having done so for Free Schools. There are many more Academies than Free Schools – 1,500 versus 24. Inserting the clause would have put a clear stop to Academies teaching creationism.”

We should not celebrate too soon!

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Re: New standards for National Curriculum

Postby cathy » Mon Jun 11, 2012 8:30 pm

It's worth looking at this article at the CASE website: Science lesson reforms leave campaigners bemused. For example:
True, though currently academies are schools and still very much in the national curriculum mindset. Creationist teachers that have snuck in will still be in the minority.

The other good thing is primary schools are far more reluctant to convert to academy status cos they're far too small to cope alone - though Gove is using force! The other positive is the NC feeds through to gcses so schools will initially not want to deviate too far away from it as it will form the exams it's students will take. So if this follows through to KS3 and 4 kids will need a far greater understanding of evolution than at present anyway. And all the resources for kids, like SATs revision guides or BBC bitesize, and for teachers tend to follow the NC closely.

The thing to watch is creationist loons getting onto the of boards of governors of academies. And the fact that primary schools are notoriously patchy in their treatment of science with few science graduates going into that area.

But eventually academies will become a problem - hopefully gormless Gove will have gone by then. :cry:
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