Foreign Policy

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Foreign Policy

Postby Roger Stanyard » Fri Oct 20, 2006 11:17 pm

The current issue of the heavyweight (in both senses) Foreign Policy publication has an article on the growing impact of evangelism on US foreign policy.

I don't want to pay £8.50 for it. Has anyone seen the article and do they have an comments on it?

This sort of thing, whilst not directly related to creationism in the science classroom methinks is important background info for understanding the environment in which creationism/ID is flourishing.

Indeed, it was the foreign policy implications of fundamentalist TV channels beaming into the Middle East which originally resulted in my concern about creationism in the UK.

It's been one of my concerns that the fundamentalists will start using TV in the UK as a fund raising platform for promoting creationism.

All TV has foreign policy implications, btw.
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Postby molecanthro » Sat Oct 21, 2006 7:55 am

I haven't seen it. What's the title of the article and I can see if I can get it through the uni.
I completely agree that we need to look at the rise and implications of evangelism as a whole. It would seem that creationism arises out of an increasing evangelical population...though it could be argued the other way...that creationism brings new sheep into the flock. It could do this by turning people off to science...with the creationists constantly lying about evolution. Also, in the US it really feeds into the whole anti-intellectualism movement that's been fostered by the Bushites. Growing up in Tennessee, I saw quite a bit of that distrust of academia, and creationism offered easy answers while simultaneously making fun of the intellectuals studying evolution. Having lived here in the UK for over 2 years now I'm starting to see similar patterns.
And as for foreign policy, I would definately like to read this article as I see evangelicals with conflicting views about what should be happening in the middle east...protect Israel, bring on the end times, collapse governments, bomb the hell out of everyone and convert them, etc, etc. I personally know of people in the US that wanted us to stop funding AIDS/HIV research/charities around the world...especially in Africa...because they thought it was a lie by the liberal elite. I can imagine that many of their beliefs cause them to try to influence such things. Abstinance only education being an example.
But, then, with this new book out, "Tempting Faith," maybe they have less power than we think and Bush is just using them for votes...which would mean he's screwing everything up all on his own. Either way it sucks.
OK, enough rambling. Let me know about that article and I'll see if I can find it.

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Postby Roger Stanyard » Sat Oct 21, 2006 9:34 am

molecanthro wrote:I haven't seen it. What's the title of the article and I can see if I can get it through the uni.
I completely agree that we need to look at the rise and implications of evangelism as a whole. It would seem that creationism arises out of an increasing evangelical population...though it could be argued the other way...that creationism brings new sheep into the flock. It could do this by turning people off to science...with the creationists constantly lying about evolution. Also, in the US it really feeds into the whole anti-intellectualism movement that's been fostered by the Bushites. Growing up in Tennessee, I saw quite a bit of that distrust of academia, and creationism offered easy answers while simultaneously making fun of the intellectuals studying evolution. Having lived here in the UK for over 2 years now I'm starting to see similar patterns.
And as for foreign policy, I would definately like to read this article as I see evangelicals with conflicting views about what should be happening in the middle east...protect Israel, bring on the end times, collapse governments, bomb the hell out of everyone and convert them, etc, etc. I personally know of people in the US that wanted us to stop funding AIDS/HIV research/charities around the world...especially in Africa...because they thought it was a lie by the liberal elite. I can imagine that many of their beliefs cause them to try to influence such things. Abstinance only education being an example.
But, then, with this new book out, "Tempting Faith," maybe they have less power than we think and Bush is just using them for votes...which would mean he's screwing everything up all on his own. Either way it sucks.
OK, enough rambling. Let me know about that article and I'll see if I can find it.

Mark.


Mark,

I don't knw what the name of the article is but it is listed on the front cover - Foreogn Policy looks like an academic journal and the article is shown, in large letters, at the top of the list in large letters of the main article in it.

There can be no mistake in listing it.

Roger
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Postby molecanthro » Sat Oct 21, 2006 10:04 am

OK, so perhaps I'm just overlooking it but can you give me a link?
I found a long article in Foreign Affairs http://www.foreignaffairs.org/20060901faessay85504/walter-russell-mead/god-s-country.html
This article is referenced on a Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life event called 'God's Country? Evangelicals and US foreign policy.'
http://pewforum.org/events/index.php?EventID=127
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Postby Roger Stanyard » Sat Oct 21, 2006 1:41 pm

molecanthro wrote:OK, so perhaps I'm just overlooking it but can you give me a link?
I found a long article in Foreign Affairs http://www.foreignaffairs.org/20060901faessay85504/walter-russell-mead/god-s-country.html


This looks to be one and the samer article that I saw in Foreign Policy last night.

Especially from this side of the ATlantic, it lloks to put matters in a more objective limelight. He seems to be saying that not only are the fundamentalists somewhat sidelines but they are inherently split in terms of both political activism and foreign policy matters.

Basically half the fundamentalists don't really want to get involved in politics as it wiill:

1. Make no difference whether they will go to heaven,
2. The immenent 2nd coming/rapture or whatever makes also makes it irrelevent.

What is interesting is the relative (and absolute) decline of liberal religion - basically the Episcopalian movement looks to be on its way out.

There is a long artical in the UK's Prospect magazine this month which covers a lot of the same ground but looks at Europe than the USA.

Both argue that the rise in fudnamentalism iscritcally depdenent on demographics - being Europe, it also covers Islamic fundementalism as well as protestant fundamentalism.

Part of the problem is that liberalism is predominant amongst the better educated and they tend to have smaller families (incidentally, I am not convinced of this argument at all.)

The Prospect magazine also argues that secularism continues to grow in both the USA and Europe but that growth will tail off (for demographic reasons) in some 30-40 years.

Again, I'm unconvinced of the author's argument because it is based on demographics. It seems to me to be little more that saying, say, 20 years ago sociliasm would triumph because working class people had, on average, bigger families, than middle class ones.

Or Catholicism would be on the increase because of its position on contraception.

That it didn't happen is probably a lot lot more due to economics that demographics.

My own personal opinion is that the fundamentalists are attacking education because it is better education that leads to religous liberalism and secularism. They know how to manipulate the system and they know that they are not going to get their way by outbreading the rest of the world.

The Discovery Institute knew what it was doing from day one. Truth in Science is playing the same game but rather more incompetently.

Roger
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Foreign Policy

Postby Anonymous » Sat Oct 21, 2006 3:13 pm

Roger Stanyard wrote:

Again, I'm unconvinced of the author's argument because it is based on demographics.

I think that it is true to a degree in some countries but it has to take
into account soci-economic factors as well. As usual, the Mediterranean
countries offer a different perspective because the majority of the
population are both Catholic and have a reasonable standard of education.

Truth in Science is playing the same game but rather more incompetently.

TiS hasn't got the same political clout it can piggy-back on.
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